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The International Mountain Conference (IMC) 2022 aims to bring together mountain researchers from all over the world in order to engage in in-depth, cross-disciplinary discussions. The IMC 2022 Open Call for Focus Sessions is open 4 October – 19 November 2021.

Following on from the success of the International Mountain Conference 2019, IMC 2022 will take place in Innsbruck, Austria 11-15 September. It aims to provide a unique opportunity for experts in mountain research to come together and discuss a broad range of mountain-related topics. The conference promotes cross-disciplinary exchange, and prioritises synthesis activities in the quest for a holistic understanding of mountain systems.

The Mountain Research Initiative are delighted to welcome Dr. Theresa Tribaldos, who joins the team as a Principal Investigator in order to help guide the MRI's strategic direction.

A very warm welcome to Dr. Theresa Tribaldos, who joins the Mountain Research Initiative team as of 1 September 2021. Dr. Tribaldos will be serving as an MRI Principal Investigator; a group of established academics based in Switzerland who help guide the MRI's strategic direction. We are delighted to have her with us, and very much look forward to her input as we enter the MRI Coordination Office's 21st year. 

The latest issue of the open access journal Mountain Research and Development (MRD), Vol 41, No 2, includes new research by the MRI's Mountain Governance and Mountain Observatories Working Groups. 

Which impacts of climate change are already being felt in African mountains, and how are local communities adapting to them? Research recently published in the journal Climate and Development explores this question through the eyes of Twa hunter-gatherers living around Mount Kahuzi in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The mountains of Africa host a remarkable range of biodiversity and are home to over 200 million people, providing essential ecosystem services both to those living at higher elevations and those living downstream. They play an essential role in the provision of water and in food production, for example, thanks to their increased levels of rainfall and the high quality of their lands for agriculture. However, despite their importance, little is known about how climate change is already impacting African mountains and the people living on and around them – and which, if any, adaptation strategies are being adopted in response. New research published in the journal Climate and Development seeks to shed some light on this.

Scientists studying tropical forests in Africa’s mountains were surprised to uncover how much carbon they store, and how fast some of these forests are being cleared.

The international study reported 25 August in Nature, found that intact tropical mountain (or montane) forests in Africa store around 150 tonnes of carbon per hectare. This means that keeping a hectare of forest standing saves CO2 emissions equivalent to powering 100 homes with electricity for one year.

The European Research Executive Agency (REA) invites experts from a wide range of fields, including the mountain research community, to register in the European Commission’s experts database.

From this database, the REA will select candidates with the most suitable profile for the following activities: 

  • Evaluating project proposals applying for funding under Horizon Europe, the Promotion of Agricultural Products programme and the Research Fund for Coal and Steel, or 

  • Monitoring the implementation of funded projects. 

The near-surface zero degree line (ZDL) is a key isotherm in mountain regions worldwide, but a detailed analysis of methods for determining the ZDL and their applicability in a changing climate is missing. Focusing on the Swiss Alps, a recent paper published in the International Journal of Climatology intercompares different approaches to determine the near-surface ZDL on a monthly scale, and investigates the past evolution of the ZDL in the Swiss Alps.

Atmospheric isotherms (i.e., lines of equal or constant air temperature) are a central concept in climatology. Their near-surface patterns are used in climate classification and climate zoning and inform the spatial and vertical distribution of ecosystems and of cryospheric components of the hydrological cycle. In mountainous terrain, a special isotherm is of particularly high relevance: the zero degree line (ZDL). The ZDL roughly separates regions where precipitation predominantly falls as snow or as rain. It is connected to both the snowline and the equilibrium line of glaciers.

The International Glaciological Society has announced the 2021 winners of its honorary awards. 

The International Glaciological Society was founded in 1936 to provide a focus for individuals interested in practical and scientific aspects of snow and ice. The Society recognizes achievements in glaciology and contributions to the development of the science through its three honorary awards. 

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