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Distinct psychological mix associated with mountain populations is consistent with the theory that harsh frontiers attracted certain personalities. 

When historian Frederick Jackson Turner presented his famous thesis on the US frontier in 1893, he described the “coarseness and strength combined with acuteness and acquisitiveness” it had forged in the American character. Now, well into the 21st century, researchers led by the University of Cambridge have detected remnants of the pioneer personality in US populations of once inhospitable mountainous territory, particularly in the West.

Ice cores preserve evidence of rare but impactful changes in Earth’s history, often called 'black swan' events, as well as smaller environmental changes.

Lonnie Thompson and Ellen Mosley-Thompson at The Ohio State University have been studying ice cores from around the world for over 30 years. They collect, store and study ice cores to understand the history of the Earth’s climate and preserve them for future scientists. In this interview, they explain how ice cores preserve evidence of rare but impactful changes in Earth’s history, often called 'black swan' events, as well as smaller environmental changes and why it is necessary to preserve the ice cores and the glaciers they come from.

In the largest-ever study of glacial lakes, researchers using 30 years of NASA satellite data have found that the volume of these lakes worldwide has increased by about 50% since 1990 as glaciers melt and retreat due to climate change.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, will aid researchers assessing the potential hazards to communities downstream of these often unstable lakes and help improve the accuracy of sea level rise estimates by advancing our understanding of how glacial meltwater is transported to the oceans.

Welcome to our September 2020 round-up of new publications! This list, updated each week, contains articles relevant to mountain research that you won't want to miss this month.

Is there an article that the mountain research community should know about? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

GlacierMap is an online geography research project calling upon contributions from the general public to help map all the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca of the Peruvian Andes.

The App was designed with two primary purposes: the first, to promote education of glacier change and the knock-on impacts for downstream communities and environments; the second, to collect data on glacier area change in the region through 'crowd sourcing' and contribute to the understanding of rate of glacial retreat in response to climate pressures.

Nearly 40 years of satellite data from Greenland shows that glaciers on the island have shrunk so much that even if global warming were to stop today, the ice sheet would continue shrinking.

The finding, published August 13 in the journal Nature Communications Earth and Environment, means that Greenland's glaciers have passed a tipping point of sorts, where the snowfall that replenishes the ice sheet each year cannot keep up with the ice that is flowing into the ocean from glaciers.

Welcome to our August 2020 round-up of new publications! This list, updated each week, contains articles relevant to mountain research that you won't want to miss this month.

Is there an article that the mountain research community should know about? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

UCLA study finds that continued climate change will deliver a dangerous one-two punch for the state’s water managers.

By the 2070s, global warming will increase extreme rainfall and reduce snowfall in the Sierra Nevada, delivering a double whammy that will likely overwhelm California’s reservoirs and heighten the risk of flooding in much of the state, according to a new study by University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) climate scientists.

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